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Project overview and project results


Project Traffic Snake Game Network Duration 2014-02-02 to 2017-01-31
Customer (project initiator) show_help not available Location Leuven
Organisation show_help Mobiel21 Total Budget show_help € 1,695,720
Evaluation Design show_help One group before/after Target Group show_help 213,104 persons
Type of Project show_help Single measure(s) Emission effect show_help -162.90 tons of CO2 per year
Links http://www.trafficsnakegame.eu/
Downloads
not available

Overall Project Description show_help

The Traffic Snake Game is a fun campaign to promote walking and cycling to school for children (aged 4-12), their parents and teachers. The campaign is very simple. Once a school has decided to take part, it needs to identify a two week window in a term time to play the game. During those two weeks, children will be provided with a sustainable mobility sticker to place on a banner each and every time they walk, cycle, use public transport or share a car journey to school.

An evaluation of the campaign has shown that it can increase the use of sustainable transport modes and reduce CO2 and other harmful emissions at the school gate. To date, 19 European countries have played the game and have taken advantage of this successful campaign.

The Traffic Snake Game can be played at any point during the academic year, but we would highly recommend that it is played at the same time as European Mobility Week in September. If campaigns take place at the same time all over Europe, this helps to create more momentum. The European Mobility Week represents a perfect overarching
opportunity to explain the challenges faced by cities and towns to encourage a change in behaviour and make greater progress towards a more sustainable environment (see www.mobilityweek.eu).

The campaign was implemented in 19 countries (Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and United Kingdom) over three years. In each of these countries, National Focus Points (NFPs)
were established that serve as national hubs promoting the game.

The results presented here are the cumulative results of the entire campaign, however more detailed results are available on the project website http://www.trafficsnakegame.eu/.

Description of the system effects show_help

During the period of 3 project years, TSG took place in 19 countries. So far, 177587 pupils
and 1192 schools played the game in a total of 507 cities. The EU-wide savings in this period
reached 2458853 kilometres of car trips and 397 tonnes of CO2.

The target of the TSG project was to generate a modal shift with the (travel) behaviour of
school children, of at least 15% more sustainable trips during the campaign and a retention
effect of at least 7% after the action. The amount of sustainable trips went from 63% before
the campaign to 78% during the campaign. Three weeks after the end of the campaign the
share of sustainable trips slightly dropped to 76%, which is still a significant improvement
compared to the baseline share. This means that the modal shift goal has been achieved.
The modal shift shows behaviour change is possible through campaigns. The number of
participants show that this change can have a real-life impact. In general, the Traffic Snake
Game campaign shows how “soft” measures can promote sustainable transport and manage
the demand for car use for home-school traffic.

Lessons Learned show_help

The main lesson learned is that the campaign was implemented with significantly varying levels of success across the participating European countries. The general trend that was observed was that campaigns in the south and east of Europe were more successful than the campaigns in the west and north. This was largely attributed to the fact that there were already many similar campaigns available in the western and northern countries, where there is generally stronger emphasis put on sustainable mobility from local and national authorities. On the other hand, countries where the campaign was successful suggested that its simplicity and interactive elements where the main reasons for its success.

Another lesson learned is that the national governance of the education system is a very important factor to take into account when planning a campaign from schools. Feedback from Germany and Hungary in particular reveals that when the education system is managed by high level structures, for example federal or even national, then it is likely that schools are not responsible for their own curricula. In this case, integrating an additional activity such as the TSG is beyond the teachers’ authority and often, beyond the cities’ authority as well.

Project measures and effects

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Modal Split show_help
Change of car-users: -9%
Show details
  Target (%) Before (%) After (%) Long-term (%)
Car driver 37 22 (-15) 24 (-13)
Car passenger 6 10 (+4) 10 (+4)
Walking 40 49 (+9) 49 (+9)
Cycling 6 8 (+2) 6
Bus 10 10 10
Train/tram/metro 1 1 1
Motorcycle/Scooter
Zero-emissions vehicle
Mileage Effect show_help
Long-term change of car usage: -1,108,141 km/year
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  Before (km) After (km) Long-term (km)
Car driver 2 3,153,939 1,875,315 (-1,278,624) 2,045,798 (-1,108,141)
Car passenger 2 511,450 852,416 (+340,966) 852,416 (+340,966)
Walking 3,409,664 4,176,838 (+767,174) 4,176,838 (+767,174)
Cycling 511,450 681,933 (+170,483) 511,450
Bus 852,416 852,416 852,416
Train/tram/metro 85,242 85,242 85,242
Motorcycle/Scooter
Zero-emissions vehicle
Emission effect show_help
Emission effect (in total): -162.90 tons of CO2 per year
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  tons of CO2 per year
Car driver -189.5
Car passenger 26.6
Walking 0
Cycling 0
Bus 0
Train/tram/metro 0
Motorcycle/Scooter 0
Zero-emissions vehicle 0
Total Effect -162.9

Note: These figures are adjusted according to control/comparison group results.

Project Promotion Activity show_help
0 occasions
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Services, Mobility Options and Effects show_help
 
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  Number of people Target Group
Description of reached system effects:

During the period of 3 project years, TSG took place in 19 countries. So far, 177587 pupils
and 1192 schools played the game in a total of 507 cities. The EU-wide savings in this period
reached 2458853 kilometres of car trips and 397 tonnes of CO2.

The target of the TSG project was to generate a modal shift with the (travel) behaviour of
school children, of at least 15% more sustainable trips during the campaign and a retention
effect of at least 7% after the action. The amount of sustainable trips went from 63% before
the campaign to 78% during the campaign. Three weeks after the end of the campaign the
share of sustainable trips slightly dropped to 76%, which is still a significant improvement
compared to the baseline share. This means that the modal shift goal has been achieved.
The modal shift shows behaviour change is possible through campaigns. The number of
participants show that this change can have a real-life impact. In general, the Traffic Snake
Game campaign shows how “soft” measures can promote sustainable transport and manage
the demand for car use for home-school traffic.
Lessons Learned:

The main lesson learned is that the campaign was implemented with significantly varying levels of success across the participating European countries. The general trend that was observed was that campaigns in the south and east of Europe were more successful than the campaigns in the west and north. This was largely attributed to the fact that there were already many similar campaigns available in the western and northern countries, where there is generally stronger emphasis put on sustainable mobility from local and national authorities. On the other hand, countries where the campaign was successful suggested that its simplicity and interactive elements where the main reasons for its success.

Another lesson learned is that the national governance of the education system is a very important factor to take into account when planning a campaign from schools. Feedback from Germany and Hungary in particular reveals that when the education system is managed by high level structures, for example federal or even national, then it is likely that schools are not responsible for their own curricula. In this case, integrating an additional activity such as the TSG is beyond the teachers’ authority and often, beyond the cities’ authority as well.
Services Provided show_help
 
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External Factors show_help
 
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